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Iver Johnson Safety Automatic Hammerless (third model)

Action​
Calibre

Magazine

32sw

Revolver

Five Rounds

Iver Johnson Safety Automatic Hammerless (third model)
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Iver Johnson was an American firearms, bicycle, and motorcycle manufacturer from 1871 to 1993.

These early American companies were the basis of many modern us arms.  Often establishing subsiduaries in various names, United States Revolver Company, a subsidiary of Iver Johnson


 The company shared the same name as its founder, Norwegian-born Iver Johnson (1841–1895).

The name was resold and in 2006 Iver Johnson Arms opened,  but does not have any parts or information relating to the pre-1993  company, and represents a continuation of it in name only.

Iver Johnson was born in 1841 in Nordfjord, Sogn og Fjordane county, Norway. He was educated as a gunsmith in Bergen in 1857, and had a gun store in Oslo. Johnson emigrated from Norway to Worcester, Massachusetts,  United States in 1863, and continued his work as a gunsmith by trade  and an inventor in his spare time. Seeking new and creative uses for his  partially idle manufacturing equipment after the American Civil War, he worked not only gunsmithing locally in Fitchburg, but also providing designs and work to other firearms companies; notably making pepper-box pistols for Allen & Wheelock.


Iver Johnson .32 Safety Automatic Hammer [3rd issue] (IWM) nickel plated, vulcanite grips, twin post latch, "long" rear sight.

The so-called 'Safety  Automatic' revolver produced by the American company Iver Johnson,  gained its name from  its innovative safety-hammer mechanism, which the  manufacturer introduced in 1894. The frame-mounted firing pin could only  be struck if the trigger was fully pulled. This lifted a 'transfer-bar'  into position, which transmitted the impact of the hammer-face to the  rear of the firing pin. This was the most advanced safety feature of its  day. Iver Johnson marketed these revolvers with the slogan  'hammer the  hammer' - alluding to the fact the hammer could be safely closed on a  loaded chamber.    This specific revolver is one of a substantial quantity of Harrington  & Richardson and Iver Johnson .32 and .38 revolvers bought in the  United States for police use in Britain in 1940-42. Some 21,000 were  issued to the Metropolitan police alone. The majority were the  Harrington & Richardson 'Bobby' model, of which 23,782 were  obtained,  but around 4,000 Iver Johnsons were also purchased. The exact  number is unknown, as some were acquired from the unrelated Iver  Johnson Sporting Goods of Boston, which also supplied Colts revolvers.

The 'Safety Hammer'  model name refers to the 'hammer the hammer' transfer bar safety  mechanism, the earliest on this principle, and technically superior to  others at this period. From 1940-42 substantial quantities of Harrington  & Richardson and Iver Johnson .32 and .38 revolvers were bought in  the United States for police use in Britain, c. 21,000 going to the  Metropolitan police alone. The majority were the Harrington &  Richardson 'Bobby' model, of which 23,782 were obtained. C. 4,000 Iver  Johnsons were purchased, but exact numbers are unknown, as some were  acquired from the unrelated Iver Johnson Sporting Goods of Boston, which  supplied Colts as well.

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30032895

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