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Webley Bulldog Clone DRESSE-LALOUX & Co

Webley Bulldog Clone DRESSE-LALOUX & Co

The design of the British Bull Dog revolver had been in existence since 1868, but Henry Webley registered the trademark in 1878. From that time to the present, the term has come to mean any short barrelled double-action revolver with a swing-out ejector rod and a short grip.121 

Intended to be carried in a coat pocket, many have survived to the present day in good condition, having seen little actual usePl The design originated in 1868 for the Webley Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) model revolver and was manufactured as late as 1917_[41 

A version made by Webley, but finished by Belfast-based gunmaker, Joseph Braddell, known as the Ulster Bull Dog, used a longer grip frame than the standard, making the revolver easier to control and shoot_l2l[SJ 

Numerous copies and variants of this design (authorized and unauthorized) were made in Belfast, Belgium, Gennany, Spain, Pakistan, France and the United States during the late 19th century_[?] American copies were manufactured by the fims of Forehand & Wadsworth, Iver Johnson and Harrington & Richardson. Belgian and 

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American versions (aka: Frontier Bulldogs) were chambered for the .44 S&W American or .442 Webley cartridges.[51 The .44 Bull Dog was a popular American cartridge that was a shorter and less powerful cartridge that could also be fired from .442 Webley caliber revolvers. In 1973 Charter Arms introduced their Bulldog revolver. It is a five shot snub nose that is designed for concealed carry or a backup gun. It was named in honour of the original but does not share a design. 

DRESSE-LALOUX & Co 

Bee carrying letters DL on the wings: mark of factory of company DRESSE-LALOUX & Co, street on the Fountain, 47 in LIEGE. Mark deposited the 28.01.1881. Wer

Webley RIC 1st Issue Second Model

Webley RIC 1st Issue Second Model

The Webley RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) model was Webley's first double-action revolver, and adopted by the RIC in 1868, hence the name.

It was a solid frame, gate-loaded revolver, chambered in .442 Webley. General George Armstrong Custer was known to have owned a pair, which he is believed to have used at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876.

A small number of early examples were produced in the huge .500 Tranter calibre, and later models were available chambered for the .450 Adams and other cartridges.

Introduced in 1867 this revolver was adopted the following year by the Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) and from then on was known as the RIC model. It was purchased by many colonial police forces and became famous all over the world and remained in production for nearly 60 years. A 6 shot solid frame revolver with 4.5 inch ovate barrel, plain cylinder, side loading gate and swivel ejector rod on the RHS and one piece walnut grip with lanyard ring. It was initially made in .442 calibre, but also later in a range of British (.320 to .476)   and American calibres (.45 Colt and .44 UMC).

On the first pattern of RIC the ejector rod was housed in a collar that swivelled around the barrel,

Second Pattern in the late 1870s this was changed to a swivel screwed to the front of the frame and the rod has an acorn shaped end.

A further change was introduced in 1881 with the adoption of the Enfield Mk II cartridge (.476), this included a fluted chamber and was designated RIC No 1 New Model.

Given the serial number is 567 suggests that this revolver was made in the first year of production.

Webley No 2

Webley No 2

The design of the British Bull Dog revolver had been in existence since 1868, but Henry Webley registered the trademark in 1878. From that time to the present, the term has come to mean any short barrelled double-action revolver with a swing-out ejector rod and a short grip

A version made by Webley, but finished by Belfast-based gunmaker, Joseph Braddell, known as the Ulster Bull Dog, used a longer grip frame than the standard, making the revolver easier to control and shoot.

Numerous copies and variants of this design (authorized and unauthorized) were made in Belfast, Belgium, Germany, Spain, Pakistan, France and the United States during the late 19th century. American copies were manufactured by the firms of Forehand & Wadsworth, Iver Johnsonand Harrington & Richardson. Belgian and American versions (aka: Frontier Bulldogs) were chambered for the .44 S&W American or .442 Webley cartridges. The .44 Bull Dogwas a popular American cartridge that was a shorter and less powerful cartridge that could also be fired from .442 Webley caliber revolvers. In 1973 Charter Armsintroduced their Bulldog revolver. It is a five shot snub nose that is designed for concealed carry or a backup gun. It was named in honour of the original but does not share a design.

The .450 Adams was a British black powder centrefire revolver cartridge, initially used in converted Beaumont–Adams revolvers, in the late 1860s. Officially designated .450 Boxer Mk I, and also known variously as the .450 Revolver, .450 Colt, .450 Short, .450 Corto and .450 Mark III, and in America as the .45 Webley,[2]it was the British Army's first centrefire revolver round.

The .450 was adopted for the Adams revolver in November 1868,[2]and served until it was replaced in service in 1880.

Originally loaded with 13 grains (0.84 g) of black powder under a 225-grain (14.6 g) bullet, it was later also offered in a smokeless powder loading. Enfield.

This particular model is not is great condition but is suitable for refurbishment. Originally nickel finish, The nickel is 99% removed which is a testament to age. Nickel finish arms do not have a long life unless look after well. It has very worn proofs incl black powder and Birmingham.

Desert Eagle Magnum Research

Desert Eagle Magnum Research

The Desert Eagle (colloquially, sometimes Deagle) is a gas-operated, semi-automatic pistol known for chambering the .50 Action Express, the largest centerfire cartridge of any magazine-fed, self-loading pistol.

Magnum Research Inc. (MRI) designed and developed the Desert Eagle,  the design was further refined by (and was also manufactured by) Israel Military Industries (IMI), until 1995, when MRI shifted the manufacturing contract to Saco Defense, in Saco, Maine. In 1998, MRI moved manufacturing back to IMI, which later commercialized its small arms branch under the name Israel Weapon Industries. Since December 2009, the Desert Eagle Pistol has been produced in the United States at MRI's Pillager, Minnesota, facility.[3] Kahr Arms acquired Magnum Research in 2010.

Magnum Research has marketed various versions of the short recoil Jericho 941 pistol under the Baby Eagle and Desert Eagle Pistol names; these  weapons are not directly related to the Desert Eagle but share a similar  visual design.[4

Smith and Wesson Model of 1905

Smith and Wesson Model of 1905

The .38 Smith & Wesson Model Military & Police Model of 1905 is the third of Smith & Wesson's .38 Hand Ejector models. Later models in this series include the .38 Military & Police Victory Model and the The Model 1905, as with the other .38 Hand Ejector models, is a six-shot revolver built on the Smith and Wesson K frame, with a swing-out cylinder chambered in .38 Special.

At various times throughout its production, it was offered with a round or square butt grip frame; checkered walnut or hard rubber grip stocks; with or without a lanyard ring on the butt; blue, nickel, or chrome (produced in very small quantities) finish; and a barrel length of 2", 4", 5", 6", or 6.5". This model had a "five screw" frame, with four screws holding the side plate and one screw at the front of the trigger guard.

Pre-WW2 U.S. Navy Smith & Wesson Military & Police Revolver marked U.S.N.C.P.C. which stands for the US Navy Civilian Police Corps, an organization that never actually came into existence.  Modern Day equivalent may well be Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI).

The USA entered ww2 in December 1941. Hence this revolver is considered pre war.

These revolvers, (there were 3,000) were shipped to the United States Naval Yard in Washington DC in early 1941 and were actually issued to Naval Intelligence officers, and into regular Naval Service.  Some have even been reported as having been sent to the RAF. This can almost be considered to be a pre-pre-Victory Model.  Very few of these guns are known to still exist and this is certainly a decent enough example that comes with a Smith Factory Letter as well.  Certainly one of the most desirable Naval Issue handguns of the WW2 era.

The Civilian Police Corps never really formed as planned but the guns were issued to and used by various defense agencies, contractors, the merchant marine and many others with needs for security weapons.

The only real difference between the model 1905, fourth change and the U.S.N.C.P.C. guns were the addition of a lanyard loop and the markings on the backstrap

Remington New Model No 5

Remington New Model No 5

Remington New Model 5, Spur trigger revolver 1873-1888.  Obsolete calibre in Queensalnd

Webley RIC

Webley RIC

Production

The Webley RIC (Royal Irish Constabulary) model was Webley's first double-action revolver, and adopted by the RIC in 1868, hence the name. It was a solid frame, gate-loaded revolver, chambered in .442 Webley. General George Armstrong Custer was known to have owned a pair, which he is believed to have used at the Battle of the Little Bighorn in 1876.

A small number of early examples were produced in the huge .500 Tranter calibre, and later models were available chambered for the .450 Adams and other cartridges.

Australian History  One of the fist retailers of guns in Australia

William Emery Ekins was a prominent Adelaide gunsmith born in North Adelaide in 1853 to George and Mary Anne Ekins. William was apprenticed to “The Practical English Gun­maker” R. Marjoram who had a business at 37A King William Street. Ekins became a partner in the business and eventually bought out his partner in 1878. William Emery Ekins died in 1937 but the business was carried on by his son Archie as general manger until his death in 1959. Archie’s son Dennis, together with his son Ashley, carried on until the business was wound up in 1969 after 91 years service to the shooting public. 13

It appears William Emery Ekins was a man of many talents, from being considered one of the best shots around Adelaide to winning an Order of Merit at the 1887 Adelaide Jubilee International Exhibition for a display of guns, pistols and other implements. He also held patents for an automatic cartridge loading machine, wind gauge, and elevating rifle sight, and produced his own line of shotgun cartridges. From all accounts William was considered not only a fine gunsmith but also a very competent gun maker.

Webley Mk1

Webley Mk1

Production The first Webley self-extracting revolver adopted for service, officially adopted 8 November 1887

Issue date suggests between the Boer wars Between 1893 and 1896 when  Major General Edward Hutton, a British Army officer, commanded the New South Wales Forces. He would later be instrumental in establishing the newly formed Australian Army.

Approximately 40,000 Mark I's were produced until the model was discontinued in 1894, the highest known serial number being 41349.  It was chambered for the black powder .455 Mark I Government cartridge.  There were 35,000 made for military contract and were military proofed.  Examples stamped with an N on the top of the grip behind the hammer and usually with a large crow’s foot on the top strap indicated issue to the Royal Navy.

Nagant Sweedish

Nagant Sweedish

The revolver was constructed by the company Nagant in Liege, Belgium. The weight was low: 0.8 kg and the output speed, 240 m/s, which gave a flat trajectory and high penetration ability. The weapon was easy to disassemble and the mechanism was double action and could also be cocked and fired single action like the older revolvers.

The revolver was produced for Russia, Sweden, Switzerland and Norway. A variety of calibres were produced including 9mm, 22.

The Russian nagant was produced in 7.62×38mmR using a gas seal system where the cylinder moved forward on cocking.

The Sweedish and Swiss 7.5x 25mm rimmed this version there was no gas seal requirements. The Sweedish version 14000 pieces were made between 1897 and 1905.

Since their proposal was changed to a few points (the grip was extended by one centimeter and the sights were changed slightly), the weapon was adopted as a Swedish officer revolver m/87.

However, there remaining weakness of the revolver was that the drum could be turned when the hammer remained down. Already in 1888, Lieutenant T F Törnell patented a device that blocked the drum even in this position. But few weapons were equipped with Törnell's invention. From Nagant, 2.600 weapons were delivered to the Swedish army.

Husqvarna Gun factory made the major part of these m/1887 revolvers.

Revolver m/87 was initially intended only for officers and non-commissioned officers. Officers had to buy their weapons for a sum of 38 Swedish Krona from the Crown or through MEA (Military Equipment Ltd.). Non-commissioned officers used their service weapons at no cost.

In 1898, even m/87 was delivered to enlisted men also, which meant that large amounts of weapons had to be purchased. The production was transferred to Husqvarna, which produced a total of approximately 14.000 revolvers. The Swedish Navy purchased a lot of m/87 in 1891. The Norwegian Navy had done so already in 1889.

During the First World War, it was borne by the “Swedish Landstorm” army units and even in the second world war it occurred in some local defense forces. Landstorm – In German-speaking countries, the term Landsturm was historically used to refer to militia or military units composed of troops of inferior quality. It is particularly associated with Prussia, Germany, Austria-Hungary, Sweden and the Netherlands.

The revolver was not only proving to be accurate, it was also proving to be much easier to clean. The m/1887 was not suffering as much as the earlier revolvers from firing residue in the mechanism and lead fouling in the bore, which degraded both reliability and accuracy. The 1st Cavalry Regiment (K.1 livgardet till häst) reported in the earlier trials of 1884 that they had fired up to 75 rounds without cleaning the revolver and still received good accuracy and functionality.

The original ammunition used in the 1884 trials was made by Switzerland but with the adoption of the new revolver in 1887 production was begun in Sweden at the Marieberg factory. The 7,5mm ammunition evolved through three major variations during its service life:

- The first type was the m/1887 cartridge which used a paper-patched lead projectile and was loaded with black powder. The paper-patch was used to lessen the lead fouling in the barrel.

- The second variation was the m/1898 cartridge with smokeless powder and a cupro-nickel jacketed projectile that was used for only a short period. A problem with shelf life developed with this cartridge and it was discontinued. The paper-patched m/1887 resumed as standard issue.

- The third variation of the 7,5mm cartridge that evolved once again used modern smokeless powder but with a newly designed lead projectile with gas check grooves filled with wax to reduce the lead fouling.

As the revolver continued in limited military use during WW2, as late as in 1941 there was a contract with Suhl in Germany for an additional 1,000,000 rounds valued at 120,000 SEK.

Coat Pistol Pilot & Fresart

Coat Pistol Pilot & Fresart

Single shot coat or pocket pistol made between 1840 and 1860's, scre on Barrel, bears worn trademark of Pilot Fresart


Age

Controller marks started in late 1800’s, Percussion cap was invented Shaw in 1814 so earliest the pistol can be is 1814 Precussion caps arms were superseded by Flobert C 1845


Trade mark of Pilot & Fresart and Pilot Freres Pilot Freres being one of the partners (FP)

This company was registered with the proofhouse of LIEGE of 1836 to 1879.


Webley 1907 - Model of 1908

Webley 1907 - Model of 1908

Maker

Webley & Scott is an arms manufacturer founded in Birmingham, England. Webley produced handguns and long guns from 1834 to 1979, when the company ceased to manufacture firearms and instead turned its attention to producing air pistols and air rifles. In 2010 Webley & Scott restarted the production of shotguns for commercial sale.

The Webley company was founded in the late 18th century by William Davies, who made bullet moulds. It was taken over in 1834 by his son-in-law, Philip Webley, who began producing percussion sporting guns. The manufacture of revolvers, for which the firm became famous, began twenty years later. At that time the company was named P. Webley & Son. In 1897 Webley amalgamated with W & C Scott and Sons to become The Webley & Scott Revolver and Arms Company Ltd of Birmingham.

Pistol History

The Browning 6.35 mm cartridge was designed in the U.S. in the period 1903-1904, but was first manufactured commercially in Belgium in 1906. The cartridge (and the FN Browning pistol it was designed for) was an instant success. Arms manufacturers throughout Europe began to design small self-loading pistols to shoot the new cartridge. Diminutive auto pistols became a “craze,” and Webley & Scott sought to claim a piece of the market for themselves. USA introduction saw this as the 25acp in 1908 (same gun)

As early as 22 December 1906, John Carter and John Townsend Murray of Webley & Scott filed a patent for a gun that appears to have been intended to fire the 6.35 mm Browning Cartridge. The gun was of an innovative design, with the recoil spring surrounding the striker, a front-mounted grip safety, and a barrel held in place by an angled screw beneath it. British patent number 1906-29,221 was granted on 28 November 1907. But this gun was never manufactured.


Age Notes

Pistols Exported before World War I were stamped MADE IN ENGLAND on the left side beneath the three-line inscription.  1914-1918  Serial no on left side was eliminated after ww1


War Time Use

The 1907 was not used formally by military, however they were used by SEO agents in WW2. One of batch of 2,200 made during July-December 1914.  12 Groves made before 1914. 

Thematic

Webley Collection - Collection holds a number of Webley pistols and revolvers. The collection has a early 1907 Model. This version is the specific 1908 Manufacture that has different features.

Pocket Pistol collection – Collection Holds a number of pocket style pistols including webleym browning, MAB, Beretta, CZ and Wather.

Investment

The blue book of gun values shows that a pistol in this condition may be worth $1500 au 2020. The pistol in 2010 was worth $600au. The investment value suggests the trend in trebling every 10 years.

FN1910

FN1910


The FN Model 1910 is a blowback-operated, semi-automatic pistol designed by John Moses Browning and manufactured by Fabrique Nationale of Belgium. Browning's final improvement on the concept of the .32- caliber pocket pistol, with the recoil spring positioned around the barrel. 

Patented in 1910(base series design), first produced 1912, last production 1983. Produced in 2 calibre option 9*17(380) and 7.62 (32acp). 1910 590gm with 153mm overall length post 1922 700gm with 178mm overall length. Fn1910 pistols are commonly held in various museums and collections around the world including MAAS collection Australia. Production 1912 -197. 

Timeline -the FN 1910 is impossible to date accurately due to records being lost in ww2. Browning / FN generally used consecutive serial numbering. Modern Browning FN1910 Variants have been produced. A variant of the Model 1910 was known variously as the Model 1922 or 1910/22. This was a larger model with a longer barrel (113 mm), slide extension, and a longer grip frame to accommodate an extra two rounds. This model was aimed at military and police contracts and many examples were produced for various agencies. The FN Model 1910 was initially designed for the Kingdom of Serbia 

1910/1922 pistols went on to see extensive service in World War Two, and continued to be manufactured by the Germans after their occupation of Belgium and seizure of the FN factory. These examples carry Nazi production stamps, and most have simple chequered wood grips instead of the earlier horn or plastic grips bearing the FN logo. 

The Hamada Type U􀀸EBi.t, Hamada shiki) or Hamada Type Automatic handgun was a semi-automatic pistol developed in 1941 for use by the Empire of Japan during World War II. Developed by Bunji Hamada. Production occurred at the Japanese Firearms Manufacturing Company, with only minor changes made as the war progressed. FN did produce 1910 models for Japan "Dai" Kanji dai 7'. symbol. meaning Great Japan records showing sn 421328 1937-1940 contract